Work Essay Topics

Different types of social work essays exist for the purpose of dissecting two common categories. These two are health services and social services. When students with a social work degree are asked to write essays, they are usually tasked to write a social work personal essay or a social work application essay.

Still, there are many social work essay topics students can write about. Social work covers a large expanse of services and issues that can be applied when writing essays. These can include:

  • Workers

  • Practitioners

  • Legislation

  • Theories

Apart from that, students can discuss how social work can fight injustice in communities, as well as alleviate they face by providing solutions in their essays. Before a student can start on their social work essay, they need to answer this question first:

What is social work essay?

Instead of copying the theories and positing of other students, social work students must create their essays based on their own opinions and experiences. Social work is about wanting to help the community and that starts by looking to one’s self.

What do you want to work on? What initiatives do you care about the most? How much are you willing to give of your time, let alone the hours you will be spending with paperwork? In order to determine which social essay works for you, you must answer all these questions honestly.

A social work essay will discuss these essential points:

  1. The type of social work involved

As mentioned before, there are different types of social work that one can discuss in their essay. For a personal point of view, you must write a “Why I Want to Become a Social Worker Essay.” If you want to focus on a specific issue, you will be responsible for doing research on topics that you need to learn more about.

  1. What issue you would like to address

Mention what is most important to you. Whether it be domestic abuse, child abandonment, or anything else. The focus will be on why it is a problem and how you, as a social worker, can contribute to eliminating the issue.

  1. Your possible solutions to these issues

Aside from emphasizing your value as a social worker, you must also address the issue you mentioned by formulating plans and theories based on facts and actual laws.

  1. Your experience with said issues

Since most social work students have already volunteered at one point or another, you can use your experience as a way to establish why you are fit to address the problem and how you can implement your plan.

Tips on How to Improve Your Social Work Essay

After composing your essay in its entirety, you will want to add some more information that will help you stand out from the rest.

  1. Add a bit of history about social work and the topic that you chose.

This sets the stage for a perfect introduction for your essay. It also shows that you do your due diligence when it comes to writing research-based essays.

  1. Talk about what other social workers are doing, in terms of your topic.

Check to see which organizations are working on the issues you mentioned in your essay. You can also cite the work on certain individuals or philanthropists, who are working with different methods than the ones you proposed.

  1. Ask for professional essay writing assistance, if needed.

As a student, you are not yet an expert in this field of study. That means it would not hurt for you to ask a friend or even a service like UrgentEssayWriting to help you out with your research and paper writing.

What topics can you discuss on your social work essay?

If you have not thought about what type of social work essay you will write, you can do some research and see what fits you best. Since there are many issues that can be tackled in a social work essay, we have narrowed down some topics that can easily be discussed on your first try.

  1. Personal Experience Essay

The most common, yet most inspiring, essays students write are the ones about their own experience in social work. It could be something as small as giving away clothes when you were still a kid or helping out an organization during your free time as young adult. Either way, you will have a lot to talk about and why it is important to continue the work that you have done.

  1. Historical Origins of Social Work

Not only is this topic full of subsets of ideas, you will enjoy the research phase of this project. You may even find that you can go a long way back in the history of social work in its primitive form in past eras.

  1. Social Work in Health Care

This is a pretty important issue that you can always look into. Every health care institution needs social workers for children, women, and men, who are in need. New problems are arising, as common issues continue prevail, while others evolve. With that, there is a need for a new perspective in resolving the problems that social workers face in a health care setting.

Social work essays are hard work, but it can pay off two-fold. First, you get to acquire a good grade and a wealth of knowledge at school. Second, you will find that finding ways to help other leaves you feeling great and ready to take on the challenge of real-world social work.

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The single most memorable line we read this year came from an essay by Carolina Sosa, who lives in Centreville, Va., and will attend Georgetown University. In writing about her father’s search for a job, she described the man named Dave who turned him away.

“Job searching is difficult for everyone, but in a world full of Daves, it’s almost impossible,” she wrote. “Daves are people who look at my family and immediately think less of us. They think illegal, poor and uneducated. Daves never allow my dad to pass the first round of job applications. Daves watch like hawks as my brother and I enter stores. Daves inconsiderately correct my mother’s grammar. Because there are Daves in the world, I have become a protector for my family.”

Vanessa J. Krebs, assistant director of undergraduate admissions at Georgetown, who reads about 1,400 essays year, told me that when she first received my interview request, the phrase “the Daves” immediately jumped out of her memory bank.

Though Ms. Sosa might easily have become embittered by her encounters with the Daves, Ms. Krebs said that she was moved by the fact that the essay concluded with the desire to pursue a career in public service, even if she wasn’t exactly sure where that desire would take her.

“This is a starting point, and she is still figuring that out,” Ms. Krebs said. “A lot of people think they need to have all the answers already. Or they feel like they do have it all figured out.”

Other memorable moments emerged in an essay by Martina Piñeiros, a Chicago resident who will be attending Northwestern University.

“Fatigue and two jobs had ruined who both my parents used to be, and I began to value the little time I had with my mother more than ever before,” she wrote. “This little time could not make up for the time I spent alone, however, nor could it assuage the envy I had of the little girl my mother looked after. She, though not my mother’s daughter, had the privilege of having my mother and her delicious cooking all to herself; I would always get the leftovers. She also had the privilege of having my mother pin her silky blonde hair into a pretty bun before ballet classes while my dad wrestled with the hairbrush to pull my thick brown hair into two lopsided ponytails before dropping me off at the bus stop. But I couldn’t blame the girl for depriving me of my mother; her parents had also been consumed by their jobs.”

It is rare that any teenagers write well about what it is like to have more money than average. Most don’t even try, for fear of being marked as privileged in a world where some people resent those who have it or are clueless about it. Yorana Wu, who lives in Great Neck, N.Y., and will attend the University of Chicago, wrote about her father, who spends much of the year in China, where he opened a canned fruit factory when Ms. Wu was 8 years old.

“That was the first year a seat at the dinner table remained empty and a car in the garage sat untouched,” she wrote. “Every dollar comes at the expense of his physical distance.”

While she has her tennis and music lessons (and expresses mixed feelings about the affluence that allows for them), she speaks to him in five-minute phone segments when he is away.

“He is living the American dream by working elsewhere,” Ms. Lythcott-Haims, my fellow reader, observed. “There is a cost to this choice.”

We published a pair of essays about what it means to navigate two worlds simultaneously. One, by Annabel La Riva, who is also the subject of a video feature, discusses the distance (in more ways than one) between her Brooklyn home and her Manhattan church choir, where her love for singing began.

In another, Jon Carlo Dominguez of North Bergen, N.J., discusses his choice to turn right out his front door, toward the prep school he attends, instead of left, toward his neighborhood school. When the two schools meet on the football field, he writes, some of his classmates shout, “That’s all right, that’s O.K., you’ll be working for us someday.” His response is to tutor his local friends with his used test-preparation books, share guides to lucid dreaming and pass on tips he learned from Dale Carnegie.

“Every single day he is making a choice, and he is conscious of the costs and the benefits on both sides,” Ms. Lythcott-Haims said. “The way that he addresses it is beautiful. He’s trying to bridge that world and be that bridge.”

One of the 10 or so essays that Mr. Lanser, the associate dean of admission for Wesleyan, read about work this year was set at a Domino’s Pizza store in Forestdale, Ala. Adriane Tharp, who will attend the university in the fall, is the author, and her rendering of the lineup of fellow misfits who were her colleagues there is something to behold.

There is the pizza maker from Pakistan who looks like Bob Dylan and sings folk songs from his homeland; the part-time preacher who also delivers pies; and Richard, the walking “Star Wars” encyclopedia. One woman has worked for pizzerias for over 25 years and is about to apply to college.

“The point of the essay is not to tell us that she needs work or doesn’t,” Mr. Lanser said. “What she wants us to learn from this is that she is able to embrace difference and learn quite a bit from those differences.”

I offered him the opportunity to disabuse overeager parents of the notion that admissions officers at competitive colleges devalue work experience, and he laughed. “We think there are valuable life skills and people skills to be gained in the workplace,” he said, adding that he personally believes that everyone should work in the service industry at some point in their lives.

Rob Henderson’s service was to his country, and his essay was ultimately about what the United States Air Force did for him.

Of his time as a foster child, he wrote, “I was compelled to develop social skills to receive care from distracted foster parents.” He was finally adopted, but his parents quickly divorced (the adoption came up in arguments before his father cut off ties) and eventually found stability with his mother and her partner, at least until her partner was shot. An insurance settlement led to a home purchase, which ended in foreclosure.

After high school, he enlisted. Eight years later, he’s still deciding where he’ll attend college in the fall. “I’ve accomplished much over the last seven years because the Air Force provides an organized setting that contrasts with the chaos of my upbringing,” he wrote.

Ms. Lythcott-Haims felt herself rooting for him, and she added that his essay was a good reminder that the United States military is a beacon for many young adults, even with the high risks that may come with their service. “This is one way you make a life in America,” she said. “It’s more common than we realize. And he is self-made.”

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